London letters to the editor, Dec 18th

GMT 18:41 Thursday ,17 December 2015

 Migrant Voice - London letters to the editor, Dec 18th

MV

Dear Editor,

This International Migrants Day (December 18) I want us to celebrate the amazing contribution migrants have made to UK society. I also want to raise awareness around immigration detention.

The UK is the only country in Europe which has no time-limit on detention. Right now in the UK, we are detaining migrants for so long: months, sometimes years. And every second, every minute you spend in detention you become more traumatised, stressed, depressed and maybe suicidal. I have been detained and suffered as a result. The UK is wasting tax payers’ money detaining individuals who fled from their countries to seek our protection. They should be given sanctuary and be allowed to contribute to society. The UK should end its practice of indefinite detention now.

Janet

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Dear Editor,

My parents came to the UK in 1967 as migrant teachers. There was a shortage of teachers and work vouchers were offered to attract them.

Today, almost 50 years later, there is a still a shortage of teachers, nurses, carers as well as many other professions. This is why I’m saying: migrants’ work is never finished.

Yours truly,

Ajit Muttu

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Dear Editor,

I am a British citizen of Eritrean origin, the country that is still the largest producer of refugees in Africa. Widespread public support for the “Welcome Refugees” campaign has given me hope that people care and are willing to give protection. The campaign has focussed first and foremost on Syria, because of the utter destructiveness of its civil war, but campaigners have also expressed their welcome to Eritreans and other Africans.

A United Nations inquiry blamed the Eritrean government for systematic, widespread and gross human rights violations. According to the UN refugee agency, 5,000 mostly young people leave the country every month. The Eritrean youth are emerging into adulthood riding the wave of despair.

The response of the Welcome Refugees group is heartening because supporters are not simply motivated simply by charity but are calling for fraternity, harmony and brotherhood under the slogan “People to People Solidarity”. 

The British people have proved once more that they have a tradition of offering protection to those fleeing persecution and for fairness and justice. For their part, the refugees and immigrants have not let the British down: they have made a considerable economic contribution to British society. 

Yours sincerely

Petros Tesfagherghis

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Dear Editor,

As a US university student studying in London, I have seen a lot of Europe in the past four months. The aspect that set London apart from the rest was its diversity and multiculturalism. For International Migrants Day (18 December), it is important to appreciate how essential migration is to the fabric of London – bringing new cultures, languages, and walks of life that keep this city alive and interesting.

It is this rare dynamic in which one can interact directly with people from all over the world on a day-to-day basis that makes London such a special place to me. During my time here I have to spoken to migrants and gained  a better understanding of the way they love and appreciate this city and how they work tirelessly to support it for the better.

Without migrants, London would be nowhere near as interesting and flourishing a place as it is today. Happy International Migrants Day!
 

Yours truly,

Madison Darbonne

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Dear Editor,

I really appreciate living in UK as a migrant enjoying all the rights like any citizen, sharing my feelings and experiences, integrating with other migrant to make a beautiful cosmopolitan UK.

No matter where you come from, no matter your colour or race or religion, whatever language you speak, your voice will be heard.

International Migrants Day, 18 December, is the day to remember lives lost while trying to reach safe harbour after a dangerous journey, a day that is a symbol of our solidarity with migrants and their families.

Regards,

Rania Elgendy 

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Dear Editor

London is a beautiful city because of its diversity and this International Migrants Day (December 18th) I would like to thank everyone who made this possible and who helped open the doors to people like me who have built new lives here. Now the Prime Minister has promised to resettle 20,000 Syrian refugees over the next five years. His offer is welcome but relatively small: I hope this hospitality will be extended to a more significant number, as befits Britain’s tradition of offering hospitality to those in need. This is a case where Britain’s traditions and another country’s needs make a perfect match.

Yours sincerely

Efat Mahbaz

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Dear Editor,

On this International Migrants Day (December 18th) we celebrate migrants’ contribution to the UK. I wonder why asylum seekers are not allowed to work in the UK. We have skills to contribute: some of us are doctors, nurses, carers, teachers, builders. But these skills are wasted and deteriorate while we wait for a decision on our asylum applications. We want to contribute to the UK economy and to be part of this society. We should be given the right to work so we can support ourselves.

Janet

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Dear Editor,

I came from Pakistan to study in London in 2013. The experience has been a privilege: you get to experience so many different cultures in one place. I am one of the many international students who benefits from the rich diversity that one finds in London and that is one of the reasons I want to celebrate International Migrants Day (18 December).

I consider myself lucky to know people from so many different backgrounds. I can honestly say that it has made me a better and more tolerant person. Everyone I have met has a story to tell, all different but yet so similar. I cannot help but think that we all have something in common but we just amplify the differences. London epitomises the similarities and one can’t help but fall in love with the city.

Anonymous

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Dear Editor

Want a migrant success story? Take the Royal Family. On International Migrants’ Day, it’s time to realise that what is most “British” about Britain has been enriched by foreign influence. By the law of history, we are all essentially migrants. So let’s celebrate diversity – Happy International Migrants’ Day!

Lucy Aitchison

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Dear Editor,

I am a doctor from Armenia and came to the UK in 2004. I have been volunteering for the organisation Migrant Voice for six years. I came to this country because I had to flee for my life – as are millions of Syrians.

It is vital that as individuals and members of local communities, small charities and large international NGOs we urge our governments in Europe and across the world to take action to protect refugees. I will certainly do what I can in my voluntary work to build pressure on governments and will tell others in my local community to add their voices.

In a world where there are now more than 51 million refugees, public pressure for hospitality and humanitarianism is more important than ever.

Yours sincerely

Yurik Darbinyan

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Dear Editor,

Every moment, around the world, people leave their countries and come to Britain in search of a safer or better life – as I have.

When I arrived in England I met many fleeing difficult conditions only to face even greater struggles, including human rights violations, poverty and discrimination.

But I have more than fear and uncertainty: I also possess hope, courage and the resolve to build a better life. With the right support, I can contribute to society’s progress.

On International Migrants Day, 18 December, I urge the British people and government to reject xenophobia and embrace migration in order to achieve equitable, inclusive and sustainable social and economic development because migrants’ courage, vitality and dreams help make British society more prosperous, resilient and diverse. 

We believe in hope for a future that has migrants at its heart. Happy  International Migrants Day to all.

Yours Sincerly

Betty B

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Dear Editor,

This International Migrants Day, I want to celebrate what migrants have contributed to the UK. Most migrants come to the UK to work, or to study and many are already highly educated from back home, bringing their talents to benefit our society here.

Some are refugees, who have lost everything, fleeing for their lives, but they still turn their lives around and stay positive, bringing their creativity and skills to this society.

Ratip Sulaiman

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Dear Editor,

In the run up to International Migrants Day today I’ve been thinking a great deal about the migrants I know and their influence on me. Angus, Laurine, Cindy are to name a few – they shared their cultures and gave me a fresh way of looking at things. Angus taught me the importance of enjoying life, Cindy encouraged me to be tough but kind, and Laurine extended a genuine hospitality, making me a part of her family and showing me her country. They all came to the UK searching for a new life and they have all given me a better one.   

Kind regards,

Charlotte Broyd

 
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